Let's Help Kids

The Case of the Ice Cream Social

There is a popular frozen yogurt chain in our area called Sweet Frog. Regardless of the temperature outside, this fill-your-own sweet creamy dessert shop is full of kids. You’ll find sports teams celebrating a win or consoling a loss after a game; birthday parties where kids can indulge in a dinner-ruining treat; friends gossiping together, and families having a fun outing. Hey, it’s ice cream, well, in this case, yogurt. The cost?

The shop sells its yogurt by the ounce. You choose your cup, fill it with as many flavors of yogurt as you want, cover it with toppings, and it’s all weighed and priced at the end. Honestly, it’s not cheap. But the richness comes from the experience. Sweet Frog, any ice cream, pizza, bakery, coffee shop, name your favorite, offers a similar experience. It’s delicious and deliciously social. These outlets are part of our community and help build our community. Many offer charity days where proceeds from a particular day are donated to a designated cause.

But, it’s frozen yogurt, not part of the basic foods of life. The cost of this treat for families living on the economic margins can shut kids out of this simple social and community experience.

At Let’s Help Kids, we don’t advertise for any particular business. We do, however, recognize the importance of community and food and sharing as a way to invest people into their neighborhoods.

The next time you take a break for a muffin with a friend, grab an after work happy hour drink with a co-worker, or take your own family out for frozen yogurt, consider the kids and families who are excluded from this important community and social experience. Then make a donation to Let’s Help Kids.

Let’s Help Kids provides visits to local area treat shops, as well as equipment for kids to play sports so that they can enjoy being with a team at these area places. We provide cakes and presents for birthday parties, tickets to movies, and sporting events. We help kids and their families to become social members of their community. Helping kids to feel less isolated and alone improves self-esteem. And that’s the cherry on the sundae.

Jen